PMI Exam


  • I am not so sure about the isms, you would have to ask me directly for specific terms.
    Good sources on cross-cultural management concepts are:
    http://www.geert-hofstede.com
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_T._Hall
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fons_Trompenaars
    I hope that this is helpfiul to you. By Oliver F. Lehmann, PMP  www.oliverlehmann.com
  • Many will come on here and say what I’m proposing is overkill. I will argue that it isn’t. This is your career right? Why wouldn’t you want to pass the first time? The exam costs a lot of money. You don’t want to throw it away. The PMP cert has been very good to me financially. I’ve been working and progressing slowly since I earned it in 2003 and am looking at a very high paycheck for my next contract due to my expertise. Don’t short change your study. You’ll need every bit once you start doing PM for real. I think my success is because of all the hard work I put into learning the material the first time. Best of luck to you and take it seriously. It will pay dividends in the future.
  • The PMP exam is more about application of knowledge. You need to know leadership principles. You need to know basic HR. There are some character questions on there as well. I had a four pronged approach to this exam. I’m a great test taker and I still studied 6 months for this test. It was that important to me to pass on the first try. Here’s what I did.
    1. I read and studied the PMBOK through about 4 – 6 times. I don’t remember how many times I went through it. Every time there was a list, I tried to memorize it. I memorized many of the inputs and outputs for each process. Of course, you need to memorize what were processes and what were knowledge areas. I broke up the PMBOK and studied a little each study session, probably about 4 sessions per week.
    2. I bought a copy of the Kerzner textbook. I did a chapter a week, like I would if I were in school. It was drudgery but it really helped me learn the material. I used that to gauge my progress and once I was done with the text, I would be ready to take the exam. I don’t really remember, maybe I did more than a chapter a week. Some of it was fluff. I do distinctly remember some of the communications models being on the exam. You know, the part about an actor, the communications screens. How to calculate the communication paths. There’s just so much. And it was an application question, not a simply fact question. It’s like that throughout the PMP exam. You just really have to know it all and to pretend otherwise is folly. Because unless you have a very firm grasp on the facts, you won’t be able to apply them. So, I recommend the Kerzner textbook.
    3. I used a study partner. We didn’t get together much, but when we did it was extremely valuable. Make sure you come prepared. You need someone as focused as you are. Otherwise, one of you will be getting the short end of the stick. Since my partner was as focused as I was, we benefited from the knowledge exchange. We swapped lists to memorize and talked through the application questions from Kerzner and other books. Kerzner has some great case studies to work through. We also talked through the ethics questions together. This was invaluable.
    4. Finally, once all of that is done, you can get Rita Mulcahy’s book. It is expensive, but worth every penny. I studied every chapter and memorized many of her lists, especially the general project flow and all of the EVA formulas. You will need instant recall because you will be answering application questions using them. You won’t have time to sit and fiddle trying to remember what they are. Using her study format in the final month or two, I was extremely prepared for the exam.
    In summary, here’s how I structured the study sessions, about four per week. This is for the first 3 or 4 montths:I would read and study a chapter or two from Kerzner. I would answer the questions that were relevant in the back of the chapter. I would then read some of the PMBOK and if I happened upon a list, I would copy it out by hand because this helps in the memorization. Finally, I would read a case study from where ever I could find it, usually the Kerzner book. This would take 2 – 3 hours for a session. This was a good amount of time for me.
    In the last month or two, I would work from Rita Mulcahy’s book. I probably memorized almost all of it by the time I was done. I kept up my review of the lists to memorize. Finally, I would look at case studies and try and apply everything.
    I hadn’t been in PM for a few years when I took the test. All of my PM experience was informal up to that point, mostly from the military. Yet I scored better than my study partner who was actively working in PM at the time of the test.
    By the way, I don’t know about everyone else, but I took almost the whole time for the exam. Listen to the other test taking tips when you’re ready to take the test.
    Many will come on here and say what I’m proposing is overkill. I will argue that it isn’t. This is your career right? Why wouldn’t you want to pass the first time? The exam costs a lot of money. You don’t want to throw it away. The PMP cert has been very good to me financially. I’ve been working and progressing slowly since I earned it in 2003 and am looking at a very high paycheck for my next contract due to my expertise. Don’t short change your study. You’ll need every bit once you start doing PM for real. I think my success is because of all the hard work I put into learning the material the first time. Best of luck to you and take it seriously. It will pay dividends in the future. By Christopher Sneed
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